FREQUENTLY ASKED
QUESTIONS

Q – How do you get paid? 

A – For those seeking comprehensive wealth management and meeting our minimum asset requirement, the fee for planning may be incorporated within future fee-only investment advisory services. Our fee for investment management is a flat 1% of the assets under our care. 

 

Q – What is your minimum investment? 

A- Our minimum investment for comprehensive wealth management services is currently $500,000.

 

Q – Why do you have a minimum? 

A – On average we have calculated that each client we service costs our firm approximately $2,500 – $5,000 per year in man-hours, infrastructure, technology, reporting and ancillary fees. As business owners, it is important for us to have, at minimum, a break-even relationship and if possible, profitability. 

 

Q – What if we don’t have the minimum? 

A – Wealth Development clients, or those not meeting our minimum asset requirement, may choose to pay our one-time planning fee of $1,495. 

 

Newsletter

 

One of the best ways to learn more about Joule Financial is to join our free e-mail list. Periodically we will send out an e-mail newsletter for you to learn more about what we’re thinking or doing for client portfolios. We will never sell your information nor solicit you through this e-mail. It is for informational purposes only.

Tesla, Tesla, Tesla – CNBC

Tesla, Tesla, Tesla – CNBC

Quint sits down with Trading Nation of CNBC to discuss the future of Tesla. Here's why there's no reason to buy Tesla at this level, pro says from CNBC.

Schlumberger and the Energy Sector – CNBC

Schlumberger and the Energy Sector – CNBC

Quint returns to Trading Nation of CNBC to discuss Schlumberger and his approach for the energy sector. One energy stock could be set to soar if crude rally continues from CNBC.

What to Think About Retail – CNBC

What to Think About Retail – CNBC

Quint comes back to Trading Nation of CNBC and navigates the retail space, finding two stocks in the muck: Walmart and Target, both of which we own. Retail gets wrecked, but two stocks could see revival from CNBC.